Difference between revisions of "User:Jkoplin1/NMAC 4460 Journal"

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== September 28, 2019 AMVs and Harry Potter ==
 
== September 28, 2019 AMVs and Harry Potter ==
 
Talks about AMVs and Harry Potter culture? Be still my teenage heart. Almost everything discussed in these videos played a huge part in my teenage life. So pardon the nerdy rant but I can’t help myself.  
 
Talks about AMVs and Harry Potter culture? Be still my teenage heart. Almost everything discussed in these videos played a huge part in my teenage life. So pardon the nerdy rant but I can’t help myself.  
First off I want to talk about anime and manga in the early 2000s. For those unfamiliar with this, I am referring to Japanese animation, known to many in the US as anime. Manga refers to the printed/comic book version of the story that the anime usually follows. I was into various anime during my teenage years and I loved looking at different AMVs <ref>https://www.ted.com/talks/larry_lessig_says_the_law_is_strangling_creativity</ref> my online friends would make. Some of these videos make MTV look like a joke in comparison. I don’t know what those people who made those videos are up to now but I sometimes go back and look at their videos for inspiration when I’m having trouble editing a video for class. My favorite is by a guy named Tyler who was very popular in an anime forum (I don’t remember the name of the site, sorry). Even if you’ve never seen an anime in your life, take a look at the video<ref>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bl48UzWcKrI</ref>. I haven’t even seen half of the anime in the video but this is some of the best video editing I have ever seen. Its been over a decade but if my memory is correct, this particular video won several awards in the AMV and video editing community back then.  
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First off I want to talk about anime and manga in the early 2000s. For those unfamiliar with this, I am referring to Japanese animation, known to many in the US as anime. Manga refers to the printed/comic book version of the story that the anime usually follows. I was into various anime during my teenage years and I loved looking at different AMVs <ref>https://www.ted.com/talks/larry_lessig_says_the_law_is_strangling_creativity</ref> my online friends would make. Some of these videos make MTV look like a joke in comparison. I don’t know what those people who made those videos are up to now but I sometimes go back and look at their videos for inspiration when I’m having trouble editing a video for class. My favorite is by a guy named Tyler who was very popular in an anime forum (I don’t remember the name of the site, sorry). Even if you’ve never seen an anime in your life, take a look at the video<ref>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bl48UzWcKrI</ref>. I haven’t even seen half of the anime in the video but this is some of the best video editing I have ever seen. Its been over a decade but if my memory is correct, this particular video won several awards in the AMV and video editing community back then.  
  
 
Taking a look at what Jenkins said about Harry Potter culture <ref>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw&feature=youtu.be</ref>, I realize a lot of different fandoms have done something similar to what he mentioned. People who share a common interest in a particular tv show, movie, book series, or video game have often times come together through that shared interest and done amazing things. Jenkins example of this particular group coming together to send relief to Haiti was a perfect example.
 
Taking a look at what Jenkins said about Harry Potter culture <ref>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw&feature=youtu.be</ref>, I realize a lot of different fandoms have done something similar to what he mentioned. People who share a common interest in a particular tv show, movie, book series, or video game have often times come together through that shared interest and done amazing things. Jenkins example of this particular group coming together to send relief to Haiti was a perfect example.

Revision as of 10:07, 19 October 2019

August 23, Journal 1

First journal entry, more to come.

September 1, 2019 Journal 2

This entry was deleted and I could not find any record of what I wrote. So I’m just going to paraphrase a bit. I focused on the idea of coming to grips with what is considered new media. I personally don’t see television and radio as old forms of media since they are still changing even today. But I understand how those forms of media are viewed as a product to be sold which is not as much an option today. The internet is vast and ever-expanding. The idea of trying to market and sell parts of the internet is kind of like trying to sell a portion on an ocean. You can’t. You can float nice pretty advisement on the surface but you can’t monopolize something so gigantic. I also find it interesting how new forms of media have influenced how we communicate today. Not many people actually send letters in the mail anymore. We either text or email or use some other electronic medium to communicate. The only real downsides of these are typos and a lack of a personal touch.

@Jkoplin1: Please title and date your entries. (See instructions.) Skip a line between paragraphs. Also, please see instructions about adding sources. This is something you must begin early as you will need it all semester. —Grlucas (talk) 07:01, 9 September 2019 (EDT)

September 6, 2019 Journal 3

Looking back to the earliest of our readings, I think most people never even considered using computers and technology the way we do today. Charles Babbage made an analytical engine. Alan Turing built a computer to help crack a code. Most of these people were focusing on using it as a problem-solving tool. Even the basic idea behind the Memex was for it to hold information. I don’t think many people considered the social impact computers have had on us in recent years. Using the word computer to refer to a machine is not the first use of the word. A computer was a person who used a machine to calculate numbers. That was the fundamental idea behind this technology. To compile data and solve equations faster than humans.

September 8, 2019 Journal 4

Marshall_McLuhan was definitely a man ahead of his time. I would love to hear his opinion on how the world uses social media today. He was mostly focusing on how television affected us but he was right to be concerned. Our society today is dependent on technology. From calculators to looking up a how-to video, more and more people of this generation are relying less on themselves and more on technology. Sometimes it is better to work a math problem out by hand or to build a piece of furniture on your own. There are lessons in making mistakes that technology can't teach us. As mentioned in my previous journal post, computers were originally used for problem-solving. But McLuhan was aware that technology would become a major part of media.

This is a bit out there but this reminds me of a series of Ilona Andrews Innkeeper Chronicles. It is a sci-fi /fantasy series and deals a bit in space travel. There is often reference to something called the Law of Bronwyn. The short version is that once a species gains access to space travel, they will continue to advance technologically but not socially. That is a bit like what McLuhan is saying that while we have moved forward in a technological sense we have not moved forward in a social sense. And that is correct. All over the world, different cultures hang on to certain traditions and rules that are no longer relevant to the world we live in. When McLuhan originally stated this, the people of the world were not ready to listen. But now it is very relevant to what we are dealing with in media today.

September 14, 2019, Atoms to bits

I find Nicholas Negroponte's point about switching from atoms to bits very relevant to our lives today.[1] Almost everything in our lives is digital now. From money to pictures to cars to books, almost all these things we use in our daily lives have become digital. An article from Forbes even goes so far as to compare a Google search to going to the library or text messages instead of sending a postcard. [2]


Looking up more on Negroponte, I saw he taught at MIT School of Architecture and Planning which has been known for its programs in science, engineering, and technology. Negroponte probably had an up-close view of new technology and ideas being developed by students at MIT.
On a side note, I have also noticed a pattern. We often learn about people who have often predicted how our society will be affected by technology and media. Not just in this class, but in many classes we have taken as part of our major. And almost every single one of these people was spot on in their predictions. Negroponte's predictions were a little more obvious since we had already started moving towards digital in the 90s but McLuhan’s predictions were very close to what we are dealing with today especially with social media. Are we really that predictable? And if so what does that say about us?

September 15, 2019, Hacking

So first off, this is not at all what comes to mind when I think of the word hacking. To me, hacking means someone maliciously attempting to obtain personal or financial information on someone through technological means. That was almost the total opposite of what Catherine Bracy discussed in her TED talk.[3] I never considered something like civic hacking or ever thought of associated the word "hacker" with someone like Benjamin Franklin. I would use the word innovator before even considering the word "hacker."
I looked up a bit more about what is considered civic hacking.[4] Apparently, I am a civic hacker. I have been working with a local women's group for a few years now, designing posters and helping out at events. I never thought of helping people register for voting as hacking. I guess using social media to help address these issues can be viewed as a type of hacking but again, I see it as innovating, not hacking.
On a separate note, I am running into some trouble with editing on this server. I am trying to edit the same way I would on the Wikipedia server but I 'm not getting the same options. I'm trying to follow the instructions but I can't find the visual editor or see access my references to complete the information as I could in the Wikipedia journal. I feel like I am missing something obvious so if someone could help me out, I would appreciate it.

@Jkoplin1: I also had an adverse idea of hacking and hackers. Generally I would say someone who does what we are describing as hacking is someone who codes if we're strictly speaking technologically. Otherwise the media has used the word hacker to give the general public the same common misconceptions on the subject.
In regard to your issue with formatting, try posting it on the class help page. As far as I know you have to save the codes and plug in the correct information. Kyannayeager (talk) 21:26, 15 September 2019 (EDT)

September 22, 2019 Revolution OS

Well, I am not as tech savvy as I thought. I understood less than half of what I heard in Revolution OS. I appreciate the idea behind making an operating system anyone can use. But I also understand the need to keep the source code of an operating system secret. I can see how one would need the source code for creating a program to work with the operating system, but I think asking people not to share the information was necessary. Like it or not, there will always be someone who misuses this kind of technology, usually to harm others.

I also want to point out from a video editor standpoint, this was very difficult to watch. If you are going to interview someone, do it in a closed space to keep out unnecessary sound!

@Jkoplin1: Great post! I totally agree with you the Revolution from a tech savvy standpoint was a little hard to understand! Overall the message did go over pretty well. Open source is pretty much like what everyone can use under certain license agreements and its pretty much the most used source for software. I do agree with you as well some information should be kept a secret which is pretty much the proprietary source. VincentH81 (talk) 11:00, 23 September 2019 (EDT)
@Jkoplin1: Once again, links are not references. Missing a post? Please see my feedback that I will be updating through the day on 9/24/19. —Grlucas (talk) 16:57, 24 September 2019 (EDT)

September 28, 2019 AMVs and Harry Potter

Talks about AMVs and Harry Potter culture? Be still my teenage heart. Almost everything discussed in these videos played a huge part in my teenage life. So pardon the nerdy rant but I can’t help myself.
First off I want to talk about anime and manga in the early 2000s. For those unfamiliar with this, I am referring to Japanese animation, known to many in the US as anime. Manga refers to the printed/comic book version of the story that the anime usually follows. I was into various anime during my teenage years and I loved looking at different AMVs [5] my online friends would make. Some of these videos make MTV look like a joke in comparison. I don’t know what those people who made those videos are up to now but I sometimes go back and look at their videos for inspiration when I’m having trouble editing a video for class. My favorite is by a guy named Tyler who was very popular in an anime forum (I don’t remember the name of the site, sorry). Even if you’ve never seen an anime in your life, take a look at the video[6]. I haven’t even seen half of the anime in the video but this is some of the best video editing I have ever seen. Its been over a decade but if my memory is correct, this particular video won several awards in the AMV and video editing community back then.

Taking a look at what Jenkins said about Harry Potter culture [7], I realize a lot of different fandoms have done something similar to what he mentioned. People who share a common interest in a particular tv show, movie, book series, or video game have often times come together through that shared interest and done amazing things. Jenkins example of this particular group coming together to send relief to Haiti was a perfect example.

September 29, 2019 Participatory culture in an MMORPG + plus Leeroy Jenkins

I think most of the NMAC majors have read about Henry Jenkins take on participatory culture. I have looked over his works various times for different classes and I can’t see why there is anything to be concerned about with participatory culture. In Jenkins TED talk[8], he discussed a senator from Chile who played World of Warcraft[9]. And I agree with that senator. There are very important lessons to be learned from playing an immersive MMORPG like World of Warcraft. If you want to play, you have to learn to work in a team and communicate with other players. When I played, my guild used a program called Ventrilo[10] to communicate while playing the game. And when you don’t communicate or work as a team someone pulls a Leeroy Jenkins[11] and gets everyone killed. And to clarify, Leroy Jenkins and Henry Jenkins are not related. Leeroy was a World of Warcraft character who earned internet fame for being an idiot[12](I think this is the original video but that quality isn't great). Though I would love to hear Henry Jenkins’ take on what Leeroy did. Now going back to concerns about keeping participatory culture from our classrooms, there is something to be said about addressing the difference between how people act in a learning environment versus a work environment. I think using media in the way Jenkins discussed in a classroom would be a great idea. Many of us have seen in done in some of our classes. It works when it is relevant to the discussion but overusing it can be a problem.

@Jkoplin1: You know that each lesson requires two distinct posts? You should see me. —Grlucas (talk) 17:21, 1 October 2019 (EDT)

October 5, 2019 Technology and education

I found Sugata Mitra’s[13] talk[14] about technology and education very relatable. After being out of college for a while, when I came MGA[15], I was surprised how much was done on computers. But it made sense! My generation grew up learning to use computers ourselves. I remember when I was five being taken to a computer lab, our class was shown the program Paint[16]. We weren’t necessarily told to start using it but within ten minutes my friend and I had figured out how to make our own drawings in the program. Computer programs have been developed so they are easy to use. It only makes sense that we learn other subjects through computers.

Ted Nelson mentioned in Computer Lib/Dream Machine[17], how different subjects all seem to have the same method of teaching. Simply throwing materials at students and trying to control their responses to it but not encouraging their input about what they have learned. How are children suppose to learn that way? I know learning to use some teaching aides can be a pain but if it helps the students understand the material then its worth it. One thing that surprised me when I started taking my math classes at MGA was we were required to use a calculator. That was not the case when I was in high school. I had a teacher who thought to learn to use the TI calculators[18] was too complicated so I had to learn to do the quadratic formula[19] by hand. It was time-consuming and unnecessary. Now, teachers are becoming more open to using technology in class but maybe we could be doing more.

October 6, 2019 Understanding New Media

Personally, I find using technology and new media for learning is a great idea. Most people born in the last few decades have grown up with technology. But seem people are not on board with it. After reading over David Sax’s article “Our Love Affair with Digital is Over”[20], I’m starting to see why. In the beginning, digital was fun. But it quickly became a hinderance. A lot of millennials [21] have grown up with social media playing a bit part in their development from a young age. I graduated from high school in 2007. I thought the idea behind Facebook [22] was to keep up with your friends from high school while you were making new friends at college. Now, it's just stressful. It quickly went from just a simple way to keep up with old friends to a drama producing behemoth. Now everyone wants to either sell something or use Facebook to promote their opinion.

Sax mentioned how many millennials worry about the negative effects social media can have on them. It shouldn’t! Social media is still on the internet so “old school” internet rules apply. I was talking to strangers in anime forums when I was 11 so most of these rules were just a given. These rules are not written anywhere but to sum it all up, trust no one, give out no personal information, and anything you say or post can always come back to haunt you. I feel like most NMAC majors have covered this in some of their classes, but unless you are studying new media, there isn’t really a class on how to use social media properly.

I started thinking back to what Sugata Mitra said in his TED talk [23] about students working together to learn. I think that is a key part of students understanding of how to use new media properly. Whether it be social media or other forms of media. I think that having a group of people in the same situation as you can help with understanding and keeping up with the never-ending advancements in the digital age.

@Jkoplin1: Once again, please use citation templates. Your titles are still incorrect. Please review: “Writing in the Liberal Arts” again. Citations (footnotes) should be placed after punctuation marks. Please make a point of signing up for a face-to-face session. I'm requiring this for you. —Grlucas (talk) 12:34, 7 October 2019 (EDT)

October 12, 2019 Hiding behind New Media

Its been a while since I played Second Life so I don’t if things have changed, but when I played, I was under the impression that most people were using the game for role-playing.[24] Using the game for sex was not unheard of. I would play as a bartender and as I understood it if someone asked you to “participate” you could but if you said no, they had to leave you alone or they would be banned from the area. There were rules and people were expected to follow them. That being said, after reading a bit more about Dibbell’s article,[25] I think I need to say this. No matter what platform, game, or community, digital or in the real world, there is always going to be someone who wants to act like a jerk or harass people. I don’t know that I would call these people trolls, but I honestly think these people just want attention or to get away with something they could never get away with in their real life. I think something about hiding behind a computer screen gives people a sense of security that allows them to let all the dark parts of their personality run free through the internet. That’s something I don’t like so much about new media. Using the internet, people are able to say harmful and hurtful things they would never say in public or to someone’s face.

Octoberr 13, 2019 Taking a deeper look at Second Life

Now I remember why I quit playing second life. It kills my battery. But I did remember my login information after almost 10 years so that tells me I spent way too much time playing that game. But I remember why I played so much and I think its the same for others who played. It gives you a chance to be someone else. And not just one person. You can be you or someone you will never get the chance to be. This form of media gives people a chance to explore different cultures and identities. You can ride motorcycles, surf giant waves, walk around as a Na’avi from Avatar, hunt goblins with a sword and magic. The possibilities are endless.
According to an article in The Atlantic,[26] Second Life started to become more popular when Facebook came out. Many of the people mentioned in the article are a bit older in real life but in Second Life, they are young, fit, and beautiful. It gives people a chance to reinvent themselves. But the game isn’t just about avatars. It can be used to sell products as well. Part of what drew me to the game was what you could build in it. You can design clothes, build houses, you can even make plants and animals if you have access to the right programs and textures. Real businesses have taken advantage of this as well. Big names brands like American Apparel and Cisco were even looking into using the virtual world.[27] Sadly Second Life has passed its peak. As of 2017, the most active users totaled between 800,00 and 900,000.[28] It used to be if an area in the game was really popular, you had to wait in a queue to be let in. That isn't the case anymore. The idea behind it was brilliant. But with so many social media platforms popping up over the last decade, its hard for something as vast as Second Life to keep up.
To clarify, I did log onto Second Life after almost ten years but only for a little while since it was overheating my laptop. I was only on for a few minutes but almost everything I remember about it has changed. Almost all of my landmarks no longer exist, some of my outfits wouldn't even load on my avatar, and all my huds were no longer functioning.

References

  1. "Being Digital". Wikipedia. Retrieved 2019-September-14. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  2. Janeway, William H (2015-July-30). "From Atoms to Bits To Atoms". Forbes. Retrieved 2019-September-14. Check date values in: |access-date=, |date= (help)
  3. "Why good hackers make good citizens". TED. 2015-September. Retrieved 2019-September-15. Check date values in: |access-date=, |date= (help)
  4. Tauberer, Joshua (2014-August). "Civic Hacking". Open Government Data. Retrieved 2019-September-15. Check date values in: |access-date=, |date= (help)
  5. https://www.ted.com/talks/larry_lessig_says_the_law_is_strangling_creativity
  6. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bl48UzWcKrI
  7. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw&feature=youtu.be
  8. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw
  9. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_of_Warcraft
  10. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventrilo
  11. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leeroy_Jenkins
  12. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkCNJRfSZBU
  13. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugata_Mitra
  14. https://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_build_a_school_in_the_cloud/reading-list
  15. https://www.mga.edu/
  16. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Paint
  17. http://www.newmediareader.com/book_samples/nmr-21-nelson.pdf
  18. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphing_calculator
  19. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadratic_formula
  20. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/18/opinion/sunday/internet-digital-technology-return-to-analog.html
  21. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennials
  22. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook
  23. https://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_build_a_school_in_the_cloud/reading-list
  24. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Life
  25. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Rape_in_Cyberspace
  26. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/12/second-life-leslie-jamison/544149/
  27. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/172768
  28. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Life