Difference between revisions of "User:Jkoplin1/NMAC 4460 Journal"

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I looked up a bit more about what is considered civic hacking<ref>https://opengovdata.io/2014/civic-hacking/</ref>. Apparently, I am a civic hacker. I have been working with a local women's group for a few years now, designing posters and helping out at events. I never thought of helping people register for voting as hacking. I guess using social media to help address these issues can be viewed as a type of hacking but again, I see it as innovating, not hacking.  
 
I looked up a bit more about what is considered civic hacking<ref>https://opengovdata.io/2014/civic-hacking/</ref>. Apparently, I am a civic hacker. I have been working with a local women's group for a few years now, designing posters and helping out at events. I never thought of helping people register for voting as hacking. I guess using social media to help address these issues can be viewed as a type of hacking but again, I see it as innovating, not hacking.  
  
On a separate note, I am running into some trouble with editing on this server. I am trying to edit the same way I would on the Wikipedia server but I 'm not getting the same options. I'm trying to follow the instructions but I can't find the visual editor or see access my references to complete the information as I could in the Wikipedia journal. I feel like I am missing something obvious so if someone could help me out, I would appreciate it.  
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On a separate note, I am running into some trouble with editing on this server. I am trying to edit the same way I would on the Wikipedia server but I 'm not getting the same options. I'm trying to follow the instructions but I can't find the visual editor or see access my references to complete the information as I could in the Wikipedia journal. I feel like I am missing something obvious so if someone could help me out, I would appreciate it.
 +
:{{Reply to|Jkoplin1}} I also had an adverse idea of hacking and hackers. Generally I would say someone who does what we are describing as hacking is someone who <i>codes</i> if we're strictly speaking technologically. Otherwise the media has used the word hacker to give the general public the same common misconceptions on the subject.  
  
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:In regard to your issue with formatting try posting it on the class help page. As far as I know you have to save the codes and plug in the correct information. [[User:Kyannayeager|Kyannayeager]] ([[User talk:Kyannayeager|talk]]) 21:26, 15 September 2019 (EDT)
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==

Revision as of 20:26, 15 September 2019

August 23, Journal 1

First journal entry, more to come.

September 1, 2019 Journal 2

This entry was deleted and I could not find any record of what I wrote. So I’m just going to paraphrase a bit. I focused on the idea of coming to grips with what is considered new media. I personally don’t see television and radio as old forms of media since they are still changing even today. But I understand how those forms of media are viewed as a product to be sold which is not as much an option today. The internet is vast and ever-expanding. The idea of trying to market and sell parts of the internet is kind of like trying to sell a portion on an ocean. You can’t. You can float nice pretty advisement on the surface but you can’t monopolize something so gigantic. I also find it interesting how new forms of media have influenced how we communicate today. Not many people actually send letters in the mail anymore. We either text or email or use some other electronic medium to communicate. The only real downsides of these are typos and a lack of a personal touch.

@Jkoplin1: Please title and date your entries. (See instructions.) Skip a line between paragraphs. Also, please see instructions about adding sources. This is something you must begin early as you will need it all semester. —Grlucas (talk) 07:01, 9 September 2019 (EDT)

September 6, 2019 Journal 3

Looking back to the earliest of our readings, I think most people never even considered using computers and technology the way we do today. Charles Babbage made an analytical engine. Alan Turing built a computer to help crack a code. Most of these people were focusing on using it as a problem-solving tool. Even the basic idea behind the Memex was for it to hold information. I don’t think many people considered the social impact computers have had on us in recent years. Using the word computer to refer to a machine is not the first use of the word. A computer was a person who used a machine to calculate numbers. That was the fundamental idea behind this technology. To compile data and solve equations faster than humans.

September 8, 2019 Journal 4

McLuhan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_McLuhan was definitely a man ahead of his time. I would love to hear his opinion on how the world uses social media today. He was mostly focusing on how television affected us but he was right to be concerned. Our society today is dependent on technology. From calculators to looking up a how-to video, more and more people of this generation are relying less on themselves and more on technology. Sometimes it is better to work a math problem out by hand or to build a piece of furniture on your own. There are lessons in making mistakes that technology can't teach us. As mentioned in my previous journal post, computers were originally used for problem-solving. But McLuhan was aware that technology would become a major part of media.

This is a bit out there but this reminds me of a series of Ilona Andrews' Innkeeper series[1]. It is a sci-fi /fantasy series and deals a bit in space travel. There is often reference to something called the Law of Bronwyn. The short version is that once a species gains access to space travel, they will continue to advance technologically but not socially. That is a bit like what McLuhan is saying that while we have moved forward in a technological sense we have not moved forward in a social sense. And that is correct. All over the world, different cultures hang on to certain traditions and rules that are no longer relevant to the world we live in. When McLuhan originally stated this, the people of the world were not ready to listen. But now it is very relevant to what we are dealing with in media today.

September 14, 2019, Atoms to bits

I find Negroponte’s [2] point about switching from atoms to bits [3] very relevant to our lives today. Almost everything in our lives is digital now. From money to pictures to cars to books, almost all these things we use in our daily lives have become digital. An article from Forbes [4] even goes so far at to compare a Google search to going to the library or text messages instead of sending a postcard. Looking up more on Negroponte, I saw he taught at MIT [5] which has been known for its programs in science, engineering, and technology. Negroponte probably had an up-close view of new technology and ideas being developed by students at MIT. On a side note, I have also noticed a pattern. We often learn about people who have often predicted how our society will be affected by technology and media. Not just in this class, but in many classes we have taken as part of our major. And almost every single one of these people was spot on in their predictions. Negroponte's predictions were a little more obvious since we had already started moving towards digital in the 90s but McLuhan’s predictions were very close to what we are dealing with today especially with social media. Are we really that predictable? And if so what does that say about us?

September 15, 2019, Hacking

So first off, this is not at all what comes to mind when I think of the word hacking. To me, hacking means someone maliciously attempting to obtain personal or financial information on someone through technological means. That was almost the total opposite of what Catherine Bracy discussed in her TED talk[6]. I never considered something like civic hacking or ever thought of associated the word "hacker" with someone like Benjamin Franklin. I would use the word innovator before even considering the word "hacker." I looked up a bit more about what is considered civic hacking[7]. Apparently, I am a civic hacker. I have been working with a local women's group for a few years now, designing posters and helping out at events. I never thought of helping people register for voting as hacking. I guess using social media to help address these issues can be viewed as a type of hacking but again, I see it as innovating, not hacking.

On a separate note, I am running into some trouble with editing on this server. I am trying to edit the same way I would on the Wikipedia server but I 'm not getting the same options. I'm trying to follow the instructions but I can't find the visual editor or see access my references to complete the information as I could in the Wikipedia journal. I feel like I am missing something obvious so if someone could help me out, I would appreciate it.

@Jkoplin1: I also had an adverse idea of hacking and hackers. Generally I would say someone who does what we are describing as hacking is someone who codes if we're strictly speaking technologically. Otherwise the media has used the word hacker to give the general public the same common misconceptions on the subject.
In regard to your issue with formatting try posting it on the class help page. As far as I know you have to save the codes and plug in the correct information. Kyannayeager (talk) 21:26, 15 September 2019 (EDT)

References