Difference between revisions of "User:D.Sams96/HUMN 4472 Journal"

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In the episode of Black Mirror "The Entire History of You" I found the concept of memory to be very interesting. While watching you learn of the events of the episode it is clear to see that everyone's memory can be viewed on screen as well as replayed as a movie through their eyes. In process of watching this I thought to research about memory it self to find anything related to the concepts of the episode. In my research I found myself  asking, what if we as humans now could remember every detail of every memory we ever experienced? Then I thought of how many of us find it hard to remember memories before or after a certain event that occurred in our life. This led me to question why.I found that their was a rare connection between the reality of the way in which the brain produces memories and the fictional view point of it in the episode, which was not too far off of the reality. In the episode it is clear that you can simply delete a memory if you wanted to without deleting everything before it or during that same time period. In article I found by the University of California, it states that the reason for why we cannot remember certain places, people, or events is because our brains are developed to prioritize rewarding memories.<ref>University of California - Davis. "Memory replay prioritizes high-reward memories." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2016. [http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160212130132.htm]</ref> If we could however recall memories that we do not think about or try to forget it would be similar to this experience in the episode where the wife wanted to forget the event however instead of deleting it placed in the back of her mind until her husband demanded to see it. In reality we all cannot easily remember memories, both good or bad, but when it does happen scientist refer to it as 'free recall.' In an article about the topic, the scientist describes it as a process when the brain "spontaneously generates a pattern and its description from a past event it has experienced."<ref>Powledge, Tabitha. "Remember: Memory Record and Replay Handled by Same Cells." Scientific American. Scientific American, 4 September 2008. [https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/memory-making-and-recall/]</ref> However in the episode it shows a more exaggerated view of what the article refers to as recognition, where the brain is given a trigger image, name etc. and it can develop a memory of an event involving that trigger.<ref>Powledge, Tabitha. "Remember: Memory Record and Replay Handled by Same Cells." Scientific American. Scientific American, 4 September 2008. [https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/memory-making-and-recall/]</ref> Depicted in the scene where Liam confronts Jonas and in quarrel demands for him to delete all his memories of his wife, Fiona. The mentioning of her name as well as through the search of his memory for her face, he is able to delete every memory of her.<ref>"The Entire History of You.” Black Mirror, Season 1, Episode 3, Netflix, 11 December 2011. Netflix, [https://www.netflix.com/watch/70264856?trackId=14277283&tctx=0%2C2%2C1f6505c0-d946-4c55-9364-f0de6d3f62d5-42538965%2C%2C]</ref>
 
In the episode of Black Mirror "The Entire History of You" I found the concept of memory to be very interesting. While watching you learn of the events of the episode it is clear to see that everyone's memory can be viewed on screen as well as replayed as a movie through their eyes. In process of watching this I thought to research about memory it self to find anything related to the concepts of the episode. In my research I found myself  asking, what if we as humans now could remember every detail of every memory we ever experienced? Then I thought of how many of us find it hard to remember memories before or after a certain event that occurred in our life. This led me to question why.I found that their was a rare connection between the reality of the way in which the brain produces memories and the fictional view point of it in the episode, which was not too far off of the reality. In the episode it is clear that you can simply delete a memory if you wanted to without deleting everything before it or during that same time period. In article I found by the University of California, it states that the reason for why we cannot remember certain places, people, or events is because our brains are developed to prioritize rewarding memories.<ref>University of California - Davis. "Memory replay prioritizes high-reward memories." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2016. [http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160212130132.htm]</ref> If we could however recall memories that we do not think about or try to forget it would be similar to this experience in the episode where the wife wanted to forget the event however instead of deleting it placed in the back of her mind until her husband demanded to see it. In reality we all cannot easily remember memories, both good or bad, but when it does happen scientist refer to it as 'free recall.' In an article about the topic, the scientist describes it as a process when the brain "spontaneously generates a pattern and its description from a past event it has experienced."<ref>Powledge, Tabitha. "Remember: Memory Record and Replay Handled by Same Cells." Scientific American. Scientific American, 4 September 2008. [https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/memory-making-and-recall/]</ref> However in the episode it shows a more exaggerated view of what the article refers to as recognition, where the brain is given a trigger image, name etc. and it can develop a memory of an event involving that trigger.<ref>Powledge, Tabitha. "Remember: Memory Record and Replay Handled by Same Cells." Scientific American. Scientific American, 4 September 2008. [https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/memory-making-and-recall/]</ref> Depicted in the scene where Liam confronts Jonas and in quarrel demands for him to delete all his memories of his wife, Fiona. The mentioning of her name as well as through the search of his memory for her face, he is able to delete every memory of her.<ref>"The Entire History of You.” Black Mirror, Season 1, Episode 3, Netflix, 11 December 2011. Netflix, [https://www.netflix.com/watch/70264856?trackId=14277283&tctx=0%2C2%2C1f6505c0-d946-4c55-9364-f0de6d3f62d5-42538965%2C%2C]</ref>
 
:{{reply to|D.Sams96 }} Very interesting read! I think the grain would be very beneficial being that we would have access to all of our memories. However, since it is an implant, it makes me wonder what age they receive their grains. If they do not receive them until let’s say 3 years old, then wouldn’t their grains start from that age? What do you think?--[[User:Daisja30|Daisja30]] ([[User talk:Daisja30|talk]]) 23:47, 28 September 2019 (EDT)
 
:{{reply to|D.Sams96 }} Very interesting read! I think the grain would be very beneficial being that we would have access to all of our memories. However, since it is an implant, it makes me wonder what age they receive their grains. If they do not receive them until let’s say 3 years old, then wouldn’t their grains start from that age? What do you think?--[[User:Daisja30|Daisja30]] ([[User talk:Daisja30|talk]]) 23:47, 28 September 2019 (EDT)
 +
:{{reply to|D.Sams96 }} I think that it is beneficial to have a grain to a certain point in life. I think the features of knowing vital signs and location of person wearabouts. I think that location is good untill after middle school because if you dont give yur child enough freedon they will want to do everything they can without parental consent. The vital signs is good for any age to determin someones health.--[[User:TSmith2020|TSmith2020]] ([[User talk:TSmith2020|talk]]) 15:58, 29 September 2019 (EDT)
  
 
==September 25,2019: Cybernetics==
 
==September 25,2019: Cybernetics==

Revision as of 15:58, 29 September 2019

August 14, 2019: Science Fiction Definition

Science Fiction definition based upon the context is a genre of literature or film that is based upon science with elements and idea used throughout the story that are also imaginary. Meaning the story will likely have made up characters and events which did not or are unlikely to happen in reality. An example of this definition would be the marvel movies and comic. Many of the characters in these series are fictional. Although the movies and comic give an in-depth description of all the things which happen to each character to give them the powers, they possess such as super strength and spider senses we know that the event taken place for most of these characters are very unlikely to happen to us in the real world.

August 21, 2019: What I have learned about Science Fiction?

The first aspect of Science Fiction that I've learned from these readings and videos is that its a genre of literature which focuses on the imaginative possibilities of scientific and technological advancement. Science Fiction or 'Scientifiction" as Hugo Gernsback referred to it became popular in the 1700's.[1] The second interesting thing is that authors H.G. Welles, an English writer, and Jules Verne, a French novelist, were seen as the fore fathers of this form of literature. Science Fiction authors are often credited by scientist for developing the real world. Surprisingly most science fiction novels are what stimulates the mind of young scientist to experiment with the ideas that these authors have created such as cloning, the atomic bomb, and the airplane.[2] Lastly, Science fiction also made way for many other accomplishments besides those of the scientific realm and other forms of writing. Science Fiction for women authors in a way led to its own movement for women such as Joanna Russ and Ursula Le Guin who were able to reach a wide audience and explore feminist issues. As well as from this genre came a new form of literary writing known as Cyberpunk which is a graphic stem off of the pop culture.[3]

@D.Sams96:I agree with everything that you have to learned. I would also like to respectfully add that we must remember that SyFi has alot of social and political messages as well. I personally believe that that alot of times the message is to remind people that we're not sure what will happen o our planet once we cross certain lines so we must care for it! I could definitely see a zombie apocalypse or a Day After Tomorrow situation if we dont clean the planet up. I just recently watched a video of rapper 2-Chains trying lab grown food ( I could not find the video or I would have inserted it) however, we don't know what will happen to us after eating that.Ambersmith5 (talk) 10:02, 5 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: Hello! I like how you explained Science Fiction as involving "imaginative possibilities". Something about that sentence sounded very right to me. On a different note, it might be helpful to attach links to the authors names that you mentioned for those who do not know about the authors, or who would like to learn more. Nice job! Christina.moore2 (talk) 15:47, 6 September 2019 (EDT)

September 13, 2019: Doctor Who "Blink"

Doctor Who a very well known television show during the 1990's. In the episode "Blink" which appeared in the third season of the show it uses common symbols but with a twist in their meanings. The angels which are common symbols of benevolence are usually seen with calm peaceful faces. In this episode they are seen weeping indicating a turn in the mood. These angels are not sent to bring peace or clarity to anyone but rather sadness and confusion. According to Elizabeth Sandifer, these angels are monsters within the plot that are used to "function along the lines of the medium they’re built in, television."[4] The weeping angels are monstrous and have similar characteristics to vampires with point teeth and long pointed claws. The solar opposite view of a true angel.

With an underlining theme of power in love and life with a hint of death the producer uses this as the angels form of life. David Tennant states as Doctor Who in the episode, "They just zap you into the past and let you live to death. You die in the past and in the present they consume the energy of all the days you might have had."[5] Here we see that life and death are both toyed with in the episode. Taking one from their current present day life and plunging them into a time period they know nothing about and forcing them to live in the past until they die. Somehow also making it possible for these alien creature to consume the life which the individual would have left in the present day. This episode alone gives its audience the idea that life is worth living whether it be in the past or in the now present. With characters such as Kathy Nightingale and Billy Shipton we find that although they could not live life in the age in which they originated they were still able to live and find love. I found this to be interesting because although the show is a science fiction genre is hints to all sorts of themes related to other genres ultimately making it relatable for all people.

@D.Sams96: I loved your thoughts on "Blink". I never took into consideration that even though Billy and Kathy were sent to the past, they were still were able to maintain peace and find love. I think this underlying theme adds a little bit more to the episode than it just being Science Fiction. Great post!! Brebre143 (talk) 01:36, 15 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: I found it interesting how the use of symbolism was twisted in the terms of our basic meanings into the complete opposite. That is a good interpretation and analysis of the Blink Episode of Doctor Who. I have seen that same theme in fairy tales which helps bring the princesses back to life after someone tries to kill them off. I brought up fairy tales because they bring about themes to help with situations also. I find it crazy instead of fasting forward in life they went backward in time.--TSmith2020 (talk) 16:55, 15 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: I love your analysis of this episode. It is interesting to think about how, in the beginning of the episode, Sally says she likes going to the house because it makes her sad. She says this before anyone mentions the Weeping Angles, but once you know of them it gives you something to think about.

September 14: Television Influence in "Blink" & "The Gernsback Continuum"

In both pieces we find that they both rely on different aspects of television and the things related to it as a significant symbol or object. First in blink we find that the television through DVDs was the helping factor for Sally Sparrow and Larry to defeat the weeping angels. First with the idea that the letter given to Sally by the grandmother of her best friend explaining how she fell in love with a man who runs a movie shop. This clue leads her to the DVD shop where Larry works. Later they find a common clue in seventeen DVDs, which all of them Sally happens to own, is Doctor Who. Toward the ending of the episode is through watching one of the many DVDs that they understand that he placed himself in these DVDs to help her understand how to defeat the weeping angels.[6] The television in this case is used as a time travel communication device. Doctor Who present in 1968 sends messages to Sally Sparrow in the present through the only source that would survive the difference in both time periods, that is television.

Television although it is not used to help save the world from monsters in "The Gernsback Continuum" it is used as the source of science fiction itself. Gibson defines science fiction through the details of most science fiction writings including things such as UFO findings, flying saucers or space ships, and time travel. He uses the narrator who refers back to the thirties a time period where science fiction was its most popular. The narrator relates the shows and movies he used to watch to the assignment he is given by a movie director. The focus of the movie is an "alternate America: a 1980 that never happened".[7] The narrator himself is given a lecture on how watching or reading science fiction can affect the human mind so that people begin to see what is not there giving the narrator several example of ridiculous stories he's heard. The character refers to it as "a kind of sci-fi imagery that permeates our culture".[8] Thus Gibson sees television and science fiction as having a psycho affect on humans particularly those who enjoy writing reading producing it.

@D.Sams96:: I liked how you connected the two stories with their use of media. Media is highly influential and plays a big part in how we see things. Therefore, the Doctor's use in media to communicate was very clever as well as William Gibson’s use of symbiotic ghost creating the dream world the narrator sees.--Daisja30 (talk) 22:49, 15 September 2019 (EDT)

@D.Sams96: Some creative insights here, but sometimes they lack clarity. Be sure to revise your writing before publishing. We have to work on your sourcing, too. —Grlucas (talk) 12:55, 16 September 2019 (EDT)

September 20,2019: Life Beyond Earth's Atmosphere?

I must say that before ever entering this class or entering into the readings of science fiction genre that I never thought about the possibilities of aliens or any other form of life other than those of us on Earth. However, the more that these readings entertain the idea I ponder what evidence they must have to even slightly form a scientific guess about this. In my research of life beyond Earth I found that most of the article are much like the story, "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" by Philip Dick focus on life on Mars. The question still remains of whether there is or is not life on Mars despite the missions and research done by several scientist and researchers apart of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration otherwise known as NASA. Scientist, Ellen Stofan states that in order to sustain life a habitat must have three factors, organic chemicals, some form of energy, and liquid water. [9] In the story we find that setting is placed in a futuristic time on Earth no exact date is given but we know it is futuristic due to the various robotic aspects mentions. The author suggests that the finding that these scientists wish for will not truly be found until further into the technological growth on Earth. For example it takes for the main character, Douglas Quail, to be subjected to a "false memory implant" in order to remember that he in fact had gone to Mars as a secret agent and why he initially had 'forgotten' this memory.[10] Stofan in the article mentions that there is a technological challenge as well as an engineering challenge as to why they have yet to land the surface of Mars. However, these challenges are not present at all in the story. In the story Dick mentions that the character has a box of microorganisms which were found on Mars surface but they do not survive the differences in the two atmospheres. There has not been any sort of findings in our current position but Dick however does make known of one great fact; that Mars atmosphere is thinner than the Earth's atmosphere as it is stated in the article mentioned as being a reason whythere is a technological challenge to entering Mars atmosphere. "While spacecraft currently orbiting Mars, on the surface, on the way or in the works are gathering data on the huge technical challenge of entry-landing-descent in Mars' thin atmosphere" Stofan states.[11] Much like the story though the episode of the X-Files "Jose Chung From Outer Space" also focuses on other forms of life in the universe but in a different light.

@D.sams96: I liked the approach you took on analyzing the story. I talked about more of the obvious aspects like erasing memory. Yet, like you mention and like I found in my research in earlier journals, science fiction often does include actual science facts. Therefore, the story can be used as both an educational tool and an entertaining one.--Daisja30 (talk) 23:32, 22 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: Sorry, I don't see the connection between your points about life beyond Earth and Dick's story. Did you read the first part of L3? —Grlucas (talk) 10:44, 24 September 2019 (EDT)

September 21, 2019: "Jose Chung From Outer Space" X-Files vs. "We Can Remember it For You Wholesale" Dick

In the episode it contains the idea that the evidence of other life has been cover up by the authorities of the military. They hypnotize those in the episode that believe they have come encounter with true aliens from outer space. Here the idea that these findings have become a ploy created by the military. They even go as far to create a staged scene with a mock version of a UFO that has crashed with two soldiers one which was in an alien costume the other who was found in the middle of the night in an hysteric state. This show has very different views as far as its development about other life in the universe when compared to the story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale" by Philip Dick. In the story it seems as though Dick accepts the idea that their is the possibility of life on other planets. This is obvious by the main character who is a secret agent hired as an assassin to kill someone or something on Mars. Although the two pieces of art focus on different planet the episode, Venus, the story Mars. The still create one common thread however, the creation of advanced technology for space travel and the advancement of memory altering. In "Jose Chung From Outer Space" the military has a flight ship that is made just as an UFO they are testing it's flight when the two soldiers are killed. Another scene in the episode the young girl describes an event where she in a room with military officials and they test to see what she remembers about the night of her abduction after they probe her brain in an attempt to as the girl states steal her memories.[12] In the story it does not speak much of the actual technology used to travel to space but it does speak of the technology used to tap into the memory and brain of Douglas Quail. The action of sedating the character in order to plant a memory into someone much life the memory in which could have been transferred to the girl by the hypnosis doctor at the military facility.

@D.Sams96: I think that the government created everything that happened in the episode because the moment Douglas said he saw a UFO is the moment the government started plotting. after that, the government put him exactly where they wanted so that the game of life would be in their hands. The implanted microchips allowed them to monitor his every move. They knew where and when he was at certain places. I fear the world we living in to become that way. Someone once told me that when we stop using paper for money everything will become digital like Bitcoin. I feel like the government is trying to become more in control and spying on our whereabouts at any moment. If that happens then privacy won't be a thing anymore. I feel that the government should have been open to what they saw and let them be apart of the investigation.--TSmith2020 (talk) 15:43, 22 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: I think the episode also shows that people do accept the idea of life on other planets or from different galaxies. There were a few witnesses that, while they do say their own encounters sound crazy, believe what they saw with no hesitation. I enjoyed how Roky Crikenson in the episode stood by his account by giving it to Mulder and Scully even after the Men in Black came and threatened him. I think this shows how there are still people who refuse to be scared into forgetting what they saw or experienced.Christina.moore2 (talk) 15:34, 22 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: Please see my feedback that I will be updating through the day on 9/24/19. —Grlucas (talk) 10:46, 24 September 2019 (EDT)

September 24, 2019: Memories Saved on Device Implants?

In the episode of Black Mirror "The Entire History of You" I found the concept of memory to be very interesting. While watching you learn of the events of the episode it is clear to see that everyone's memory can be viewed on screen as well as replayed as a movie through their eyes. In process of watching this I thought to research about memory it self to find anything related to the concepts of the episode. In my research I found myself asking, what if we as humans now could remember every detail of every memory we ever experienced? Then I thought of how many of us find it hard to remember memories before or after a certain event that occurred in our life. This led me to question why.I found that their was a rare connection between the reality of the way in which the brain produces memories and the fictional view point of it in the episode, which was not too far off of the reality. In the episode it is clear that you can simply delete a memory if you wanted to without deleting everything before it or during that same time period. In article I found by the University of California, it states that the reason for why we cannot remember certain places, people, or events is because our brains are developed to prioritize rewarding memories.[13] If we could however recall memories that we do not think about or try to forget it would be similar to this experience in the episode where the wife wanted to forget the event however instead of deleting it placed in the back of her mind until her husband demanded to see it. In reality we all cannot easily remember memories, both good or bad, but when it does happen scientist refer to it as 'free recall.' In an article about the topic, the scientist describes it as a process when the brain "spontaneously generates a pattern and its description from a past event it has experienced."[14] However in the episode it shows a more exaggerated view of what the article refers to as recognition, where the brain is given a trigger image, name etc. and it can develop a memory of an event involving that trigger.[15] Depicted in the scene where Liam confronts Jonas and in quarrel demands for him to delete all his memories of his wife, Fiona. The mentioning of her name as well as through the search of his memory for her face, he is able to delete every memory of her.[16]

@D.Sams96: Very interesting read! I think the grain would be very beneficial being that we would have access to all of our memories. However, since it is an implant, it makes me wonder what age they receive their grains. If they do not receive them until let’s say 3 years old, then wouldn’t their grains start from that age? What do you think?--Daisja30 (talk) 23:47, 28 September 2019 (EDT)
@D.Sams96: I think that it is beneficial to have a grain to a certain point in life. I think the features of knowing vital signs and location of person wearabouts. I think that location is good untill after middle school because if you dont give yur child enough freedon they will want to do everything they can without parental consent. The vital signs is good for any age to determin someones health.--TSmith2020 (talk) 15:58, 29 September 2019 (EDT)

September 25,2019: Cybernetics

The only similarity that I found between the episode "The Entire History of You" Black Mirror and the reading "The Girl Who Was Plugged In" James Tiptree was the use of cybernetics. Cybernetics is defined as the science of communication and automatic control system within mechanics and living things. The difference is the use of cybernetics in both pieces. In Black Mirror the cybernetic aspect of it is the idea of communication through the memory devices implants in each individual. In the episode however we find that the individuals in the world can replay memories. The device within them is the communication device which can detect televisions near and allow for them to play these memories as long as they use a smaller device similar to that of a remote. In the reading of "The Girl Who Was Plugged In" we find a more advanced use of cybernetics through the remote controlling of mechanically operated artificial humans. A young girl, P. Burke, suffers from pituitary dystrophy. When her attempt at public suicide fails, understanding that it is illegal, she given an offer to escape the punishment by a representative from Global Transmissions Corporations (GTX). They connect P. Burke to wiring which essentially allows her to remote control an genetically modified human who they refer to as Delphi in this the human which once was P. Burke becomes the "remote."[17] Here in this story we find that communication is done through the artificial model through the use of electrodes and cables running into her body using the mind of the actual human which posses them. Communication from the brain with mechanics.

References

  1. [1] DocSpot (March 7 2018). "The Truth About Science Fiction (Documentary)". YouTube. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  2. [2] DocSpot (March 7 2018). "The Truth About Science Fiction (Documentary)". YouTube. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  3. [3]Zaidi, Leah (2018). "Brave New Worlds: Science Fiction and Transition Design". SSRN Electronic Journal. doi:10.2139/ssrn.3217423. ISSN 1556-5068.
  4. [4] Sandifer, Elizabeth (October 2013). "The Image of An Angel (Blink)". Eruditorium Press. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  5. [5] "Doctor Who S3 E10: Blink". DailyMotion. 00:26:10-00:26:25. Retreived September 12, 2019.
  6. [6] "Doctor Who S3 E10: Blink". DailyMotion. Retreived September 12, 2019.
  7. Gibson, William. "The Gernsback Continuum". Norton Book of Science Fiction. Ursula K. Le Guin, Brian Attebury. New Nork: W. W. Norton & Company. 1993.
  8. Gibson, William. "The Gernsback Continuum". Norton Book of Science Fiction. Ursula K. Le Guin, Brian Attebury. New Nork: W. W. Norton & Company. 1993.
  9. Thisdell, Dan (June 2014). "Life On Mars". Flight International. 185 (no. 5443): 20–26. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  10. Dick, Philip K. (1966). We Can Remember It For You Wholesale (PDF). pp. 1–19.
  11. Thisdell, Dan (June 2014). "Life On Mars". Flight International. 185 (no. 5443): 20–26. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  12. "The X-Files Season 3 Episode 20 - Jose Chung's From Outer Space". DailyMotion. February 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2019.
  13. University of California - Davis. "Memory replay prioritizes high-reward memories." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2016. [7]
  14. Powledge, Tabitha. "Remember: Memory Record and Replay Handled by Same Cells." Scientific American. Scientific American, 4 September 2008. [8]
  15. Powledge, Tabitha. "Remember: Memory Record and Replay Handled by Same Cells." Scientific American. Scientific American, 4 September 2008. [9]
  16. "The Entire History of You.” Black Mirror, Season 1, Episode 3, Netflix, 11 December 2011. Netflix, [10]
  17. Tiptree, James. "The Girl Who Was Plugged In." Literacy, Technology, Society: Confronting the Issues. Eds. Gail E. Hawisher and Cynthia L. Selfe. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle Creek, NJ: 1997. p. 443-466